Last edited by Dilar
Tuesday, July 21, 2020 | History

3 edition of US Collective Memory, Intervention and Vietnam found in the catalog.

US Collective Memory, Intervention and Vietnam

David Ryan

US Collective Memory, Intervention and Vietnam

The Cultural Politics of US Foreign Policy since 1969 (Contemporary Security Studies)

by David Ryan

  • 302 Want to read
  • 32 Currently reading

Published by Routledge .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • American history: postwar, from c 1945 -,
  • Cultural studies,
  • International relations,
  • History,
  • Military,
  • USA,
  • History / Military / Vietnam War,
  • Military - Vietnam War,
  • Collective memory,
  • Intervention (International law),
  • United States

  • The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Number of Pages256
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL10205155M
    ISBN 100415405645
    ISBN 109780415405645

    Search the world's most comprehensive index of full-text books. My library.   This introduction presents an overview of the key concepts discussed in the subsequent chapters of this book. The book considers memory as a specific framework for the study of popular film, intervening in growing debates about the status and function of memory in cultural life and discourse. It examines the relationship between official and popular history and the constitution of memory.

    Collective memory refers to the shared pool of memories, knowledge and information of a social group that is significantly associated with the group's identity. The English phrase "collective memory" and the equivalent French phrase "la mémoire collective" appeared in the second half of the nineteenth philosopher and sociologist Maurice Halbwachs analyzed and advanced the concept. Veteran Narratives and the Collective Memory of the Vietnam War [John A. Wood]. In the decades since the Vietnam War, veteran memoirs have influenced Americans’ understanding of the conflict. Yet few historians or literary scholars have scrutinized.

    History, Memory, and Monuments: An Overview of the Scholarly Literature on Commemoration Kirk Savage, University of Pittsburgh “Monuments are good for nothing,” a North Carolina Congressman declared in In the founding years of the United States, many argued that democracy and the spread of literacy had made commemorative rituals and monuments obsolete, a leftover from the days . Book Description: In the popular imagination, opposition to the Vietnam War was driven largely by college students and elite intellectuals, while supposedly reactionary blue-collar workers largely supported the war effort. InHardhats, Hippies, and Hawks, Penny Lewis challenges this collective memory of class polarization. Through close readings.


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US Collective Memory, Intervention and Vietnam by David Ryan Download PDF EPUB FB2

: US Collective Memory, Intervention and Vietnam: The Cultural Politics of US Foreign Policy since (Contemporary Security Studies) (): Ryan, David: Books. This book explores the construction and interaction of US collective memory with the politics of US intervention since the late s.

On the one hand, the United States drew lessons that after Vietnam it had to demonstrate its resolve and credibility through the continued use of force, yet there were considerable domestic constraints to doing so generated from collective : Copertina rigida.

The Vietnam War has generated significant diplomatic and cultural influences on US foreign policy. This book explores the construction and interaction of Intervention and Vietnam book collective memory with the politics of US intervention since the late s.

Today, we are more isolated, individualized and atomized than ever before. How collective memory is formed, and the crucial influence it exercises on the way a people orient themselves toward the world, is the subject of a fascinating new book by Viet Thanh Nguyen – author of the brilliant novel The : Michael J.

Brenner. Veteran Narratives and the Collective Memory of the Vietnam War. In the decades since the Vietnam War, veteran memoirs have influenced Americans' understanding of the conflict. Yet few historians or literary scholars have scrutinized how the genre has shaped the nation's collective memory of the war and its aftermath.3/5(1).

In this chapter we explore the American collective memory of the Vietnam War. Using the theory of cultural trauma, we elucidate the ways in which the memory of the war continues to impact American collective identity and the social processes through which this memory is constructed and maintained.

Wikipedia is also a place for collective memory building around historical events, such as the Arab Spring and the Vietnam War [7, 33, 36], as well as unfolding coverage of breaking news [25,27,   In this regard, one also needs to historicize the works on US collective memory of the Vietnam War.

Collective memories are inherently patriotic to some degree, even on the question of this war in which the orthodox analysis is so critical. The orthodox analysis confronts limits precisely because it focused on American questions and agency.

Collective Memory styles itself on the idea of an independent and locally made magazine targeted to a global audience. Just as a magazine approaches its editorial content, Collective Memory plans to regularly curate its artifacts and product lineup in order to celebrate an ever-changing pool of local talent.

Founded by a Vietnamese duo of travel writer and photographer, the concept for Collective Memory emerged from a shared enthusiasm for Vietnamese culture. While constantly on the move for assignments, the creators use these opportunities to scour the country for the best products that Vietnam.

Last year Nguyen was nominated for the National Book Award for Nonfiction for Nothing Ever Dies: Vietnam and the Memory of War, a cultural history of the conflict. Together, the two works offer a stern rebuke to narratives of the past that attempt to absolve the United States and relegate the victims of its imperialism to the background.

This nicely written book should be available to all, and especially to scholars and discerning public intellectuals. Summing up: Highly recommended.” CHOICE “Veteran Narratives and the Collective Memory of the Vietnam War is a discerning investigation of historical remembrance in the writings of Vietnam War veterans.

John Wood deftly reveals how prewar, wartime, and postwar experiences shaped the composition and content of published memoirs. Sažetak. Part of a wider project on how the Vietnam War () is remembered by three key collectives, Vietnamese communists, Vietnamese Americans and the United States, this article focuses primarily on the latter.

Using the theory of cultural trauma as its framework, this is a study in trauma and collective memory, its impact and the social processes through which such memory is. “John Wood’s venture into collective memory provides Americans with painful insight into how Vietnam veterans perceived the conflict, and also how those of us who did not go to fight perceived them.

This book is a considerable historical achievement. More importantly, it can help us ‘get right’ with the war, our warriors and s: 3.

Book Description: Four decades after its end, the American war in Vietnam still haunts the nation’s collective memory. Its lessons, real and imagined, continue to shape government policies and military strategies, while the divisions it spawned infect domestic politics and fuel the socalled culture wars.

Through the analysis of international perceptions and power, it shows that South Vietnam was a vital interest of the United States. The book provides many new insights into the overthrow of Ngo. The Spitting Image: Myth, Memory and the Legacy of Vietnam is a book by Vietnam veteran and sociology professor Jerry Lembcke.

The book is an analysis of the widely believed narrative that American soldiers were spat upon and insulted by anti-war protesters upon returning home from the Vietnam book examines the origin of the earliest stories; the popularization of the "spat.

The half-century that now separates us from that conflict, however, has dimmed our collective memory. Many Korean War veterans have considered themselves forgotten, their place in history sandwiched between the sheer size of World War II and the fierce controversies of the Vietnam War.

A successful architectural intervention in the city which brings out the locus through other means than the isolated monument is able to contribute successfully to the collective memory of the city.

On the other hand, a statue or a fragment of one, which has many living memories ascribed to it, is able to define locus more effectively than an. This volume brings together Ron Eyerman’s most important interventions in the field of cultural trauma and offers an accessible entry point into the origins and development of this Collective Memory, and the Vietnam War.

*immediately available upon purchase as print book shipments may be delayed due to the COVID crisis. ebook. Although these actions are fantastical, this book shows how examining their stories can illuminate critical issues of war and collective memory in Vietnam and the modern world more generally.

Reviews Review of the hardback:‘The voices of Americans lost, dead, maimed physically or .summary Four decades after its end, the American war in Vietnam still haunts the nation’s collective memory.

Its lessons, real and imagined, continue to shape government policies and military strategies, while the divisions it spawned infect domestic politics and fuel the so-called culture wars.Many renowned Vietnam War historians have used veteran memoirs in their scholarship, including Christian G.

Appy, Marilyn B. Young, and George C. Herring Unlike scholars working in other!elds, however, historians have not seriously explored how these books might have af-fected collective memory Most historians take just a few quotations.